‘Chaos’ on Twitter as Twitter and YouTube are forced to suspend their streaming services over ‘fake accounts’

The social media giant is scrambling to restore its popular streaming video services after users discovered that they had been hacked by a group of pranksters pretending to be Twitter and Google employees.

Twitter said that it had been contacted by an anonymous person claiming to have been involved in the attack.

“We have confirmed that we have been hacked,” the social media company said.

“Twitter is investigating this report.

We are working to help our users and staff as soon as possible.”

Twitter said the attack on its video platform was “a result of the recent release of a new version of our YouTube API, which was used by a small number of prank Twitter accounts.”

It added that it was working to restore normal functionality.

“At this time, our teams are working around the clock to bring you the best experience for your users,” the company said in a statement.

YouTube is a social media network that lets users upload videos and upload videos that can be viewed on a wide variety of devices, including tablets and phones.

It is also a popular source for content, which is widely used on the internet for free.

It also has a growing audience of young people.

“The attack we have discovered is a result of a small group of people who compromised our API and tried to take advantage of the fact that we were running a beta test of our new YouTube API,” YouTube said.

YouTube also said it was taking steps to ensure its employees are safe, including hiring a security officer, and that it would provide more detailed information about the attack and the identity of the attackers within two weeks.

The company said it did not know who the attackers were or where they were based.

“This is the first time that YouTube has been affected by a serious cyberattack.

We continue to work with our users to keep them informed and safe,” YouTube chief security officer Jason Fried told a news conference.

“It’s clear this attack is more serious than we had thought.

This is not just a bug.

This type of attack could be a reflection of a broader problem that we see in the world of cybersecurity.”

YouTube also urged users to be vigilant about what they post online.

“People need to be cautious of what they share, especially if they post content that could be seen as provocative or controversial, especially in light of recent events,” it said in its statement.

Twitter, which has more than 7 billion users, said in March that it will temporarily stop allowing users to upload videos on its social media site.

It said it would temporarily stop its service from appearing on mobile devices, and it will also temporarily suspend all accounts that have more than 100 followers.

“As soon as we can, we’ll restore full functionality for everyone,” the platform said.

Facebook has said that video sharing was compromised and that videos from its users could be shared as fake.

Google said that a group that was posing as Google employees in a video had posted videos on YouTube showing its YouTube logo.

The videos had already been taken down, but some videos on the group’s channel had already made their way to YouTube.

“Our investigation is ongoing,” Google said.

The group said it had targeted people “in the United States and Canada”.

Google said it could not confirm that the group was involved in a serious attack.

Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

YouTube’s stock price plunged by almost 20 per cent on Monday, with the shares falling from around $80 to around $40.